TED Talks

Ideas worth spreading

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http://ted.com/

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Wildfires have gotten worse in the past 100 years, but why? Well, first, land that was once dry is now filled with greenery. And with the trees growing closer together than ever before, it’s easy for diseases to spread and weaken large sections of the forests. Couple that with the fact that summers are getting hotter, drier, and windier than ever. And finally, we’re building houses on top of everything! These factors (plus a few others) are a recipe for a fire disaster much like what we’ve seen across California this year. So what do we do? “We need to put the right kind of fire back into the system again,” says forest ecologist Paul Hessburg. “It's how we can resize the severity of many of our future fires. And the silver lining is that we have tools and we have know-how to do this.” To learn how we can restore the natural balance of the landscape and prevent these disasters from occurring, watch Paul’s #TEDTalk at go.ted.com/wildfires

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Have you heard of Mae Jemison, YouYou Tu, Katherine Johnson, Maryam Mirzakhani, or Rita Levi-Montalcini? All five are women in STEM who have made incredible contributions to science and mathematics, yet their names rarely appear in history books. Artist and neuroscientist Amanda Phingbodhipakkiya (@alonglastname) created an illustration project called Beyond Curie to showcase those five women and more, hoping to give them all the recognition they deserve. To learn more about the transformative contributions they made in their fields, visit go.ted.com/plan. You can also see more of Amanda’s work at go.ted.com/beyondcurie. @DoSomething launched a campaign called #MissingInHistory to fight misrepresentation and erasure in textbooks. Visit go.ted.com/missinginhistory to learn how you can participate.

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Actor Justin Baldoni has a challenge for men: “See if you can use the same qualities that you feel make you a man to go deeper into yourself. Your strength, your bravery, your toughness: Can we redefine what those mean and use them to explore our hearts?” In his new #TEDTalk, the Jane the Virgin actor starts a dialogue about masculinity and unravels what it means to be “man enough.” Watch @justinbaldoni’s full talk at go.ted.com/manenough

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The textile industry is one of the most polluting in the world. Thanks to the rise of fast fashion, textile waste is filling our landfills -- and often the materials are made up of harmful petroleum-based chemicals left over from the dyeing process. But what if we could dye textiles with pigment produced by bacteria? That’s what designer Natsai Audrey Chieza decided to do. Streptomyces coelicolor is a bacteria that can grow directly on silk, and each colony produces a unique pigment. With enough cells, you can dye an entire cloth like the one pictured here. The result is bright and vibrant color created without the use of any chemicals. “You can start to see how imaginative and inspiring modes of making exist in nature that we can use to build capacity around new bio-based industries,” says Natsai. “Biotechnology is going to touch every part of our lived experience.” To see more of @faberfutures’s work and learn how the process works, watch her #TEDTalk at go.ted.com/bacteriafashion

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This is a self-portrait of @TEDFellow and artist Uldus Bakhtiozina. In it, she embodies the Triskele, a Celtic symbol representing a triple spiral with various meanings. Uldus’s work is often inspired by classic fairy tales, and her self portraits are no different. She creates them to explore alternative identities and comment on the cliches of modern womanhood. “I love to become a different person in front of the camera,” she says. “My self-portraits are a mirror which shows me another version of myself, existing somewhere else, having another life.” To learn more about @uldusss’s work and the art of self-portraiture, visit go.ted.com/selfportrait

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These children are reading inside of a mud cave. It’s part of a school in Bangladesh that is made entirely out of dirt and bamboo. Architect Anna Heringer designed it for her thesis project 13 years ago to show that you can create cozy and beautiful structures using only natural materials. “There are a lot of resources given by nature for free -- all we need is our sensitivity to see them and our creativity to use them," she says. To watch her #TEDTalk, visit go.ted.com/mudbuildings Photo by Rolf Bauerdick

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When @TEDFellow Kayla Briët was four-years-old, her dad brought her to watch a Taos Pueblo Hoop Dance, a traditional dance created hundreds of years ago in Southwestern USA. The dance takes hoops made out of willow wood and threads them together to create formations of the natural world. “Watching this dance was magic to me,” says Kayla, whose father is from the Prairie Band's Potawatomi Tribe in Northeastern Kansas. “Like with a time capsule, I was taking a look through a cultural window to the past. I felt a deeper connection to how my ancestors used to look at the world around them.” The experience inspired her to turn to filmmaking and composing to reclaim the stories of her heritage. Through music and ultimately her latest documentary film, “Smoke That Travels,” @kaylabriet explores her fear that her Native heritage will be forgotten in time. To learn more about her work, visit go.ted.com/timecapsules

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This tower sucks up smog, turns it into clean air, and filters out the smog particles so they can be turned into diamonds. How cool is that? Dutch artist Daan Roosengarde came up with the idea while he was in Beijing. The smog was so thick he could barely see the city, so he set out to build the largest air purifier in the world. This tower takes in 30,000 cubic meters of polluted air per hour, leaving behind gross, sooty particles — 40% of which was made of carbon. Compress carbon, and you get diamonds! Daan has even created a couple engagement rings out of the smog. “It’s all about connecting new technology with creative thinking,” says Daan. “If you start thinking about that, there is so much you can imagine, so much more you can do.” To learn more, visit go.ted.com/smogdiamonds

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What can octopuses teach us about different kinds of intelligence? Octopuses’ neurons lie outside their central brain, causing them to experience consciousness very differently than humans and most mammals do. They might not even have a full grasp of their own bodies, which explains why their tentacles operate independently and can still function even after being severed. What does this have to do with us? “We humans are forever trapped within the inner universes prescribed by our brains, bodies and environments,” says cognitive neuroscientist Anil Seth. “But by studying the limits of our own awareness alongside the abilities of other species and by realizing that how we experience the world and the self is not the only way, we can gain startling glimpses into a space of possible consciousnesses.” Read his full article at go.ted.com/octopusbrain Animation by @dennism00re

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Jackson Bird is transgender, and he has a message for anyone too scared to ask questions or worried they'll say the wrong thing: just ask. It might be difficult, and you might slip up a few times, but people who are trans deserve your respect. Watch @jackisnotabird’s full #TEDTalk at go.ted.com/transrespect to learn more about misconceptions about pronouns and transitioning. #TransgenderAwarenessWeek

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This is a numeric model that depicts the cracks in Greenland’s ice sheet. It shows how a crevasse can fracture when filled with water from a glacier aquifer. That water causes a three millimeter increase in global sea level rise per year. It might not seem like a lot, but it is already making a tremendous impact. “How much sea level rise is coming, and how fast will it get here? We need to know how much and how fast, so the world and its communities can plan for the sea level rise that's coming,” says glaciologist Kristin. To watch her full #TEDTalk, visit go.ted.com/greenlandicesheet Video courtesy of NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Scientific Visualization Studio, with data from Ian Howat, Ted Scambos and Reto Stockli

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When Gretchen Carlson spoke out about her experience of workplace harassment, it inspired women everywhere to share their own stories, be fierce, and take their power back. “We will no longer be underestimated, intimidated or set back," Gretchen says. "We will stand up and speak up and have our voices heard. We will be the women we were meant to be." To learn what we can do to take steps toward ending this problem, watch @therealgretchencarlson's #TEDTalk at go.ted.com/befierce

TED Talks Name Data

TED Talks Data Details
TED Talks full length: 9 characters (9 bytes)
Unique part(s): TED Talks
TED Talks Name Volwes: Ea (2 characters)
TED Talks Name Consonants: TD Tlks (7 characters)

TED Talks user Name Encoding

  • 10000111 Decimal name:
  • 101100100101100100010000101100110001110110111011 Binary name:
  • 84 69 68 32 84 97 108 107 115 ASCII name:
  • 5445442054616c6b73 HEX name:
  • c461bd9cfd372f2088ff7c596c77c5c0 MD5 Encoding:
  • 8f6a3fa033bb802b8b920d158337d6534e0dfeac SHA1 Encoding:
  • TTTLKS Metaphone name:
  • T342 Name Soundex:
  • VEVEIFRhbGtz Base64 Encoding:
  • sklaT DET Reverse name:

TED Talks user name Nato Encoding

Letter Code Word U.S. Army standard ICAO and ITU Roman standard FAA standards ICAO IPA standard SIO (France) ICAO recording (1955) Consolidated transcription
T Tango TANG go TANG GO TANGGO or TANG-GO ˈtænɡo tang go [ˈtæŋɡoʊ] /ˈtæŋɡoʊ/ TANG-goh
E Echo EKK oh ECK OH ECKOH or ECK-OH ˈeko èk o [ˈɛkoʊ] /ˈɛkoʊ/
D Delta DEL tah DELL TAH DELLTAH or DELL-TAH ˈdeltɑ del tah [ˈdɛltʌ] /ˈdɛltɑː/ DEL-tah
T Tango TANG go TANG GO TANGGO or TANG-GO ˈtænɡo tang go [ˈtæŋɡoʊ] /ˈtæŋɡoʊ/ TANG-goh
a Alfa
ATIS: Alpha
AL fah AL FAH ALFAH or AL-FAH ˈælfɑ al fah [ˈælfʌ] /ˈælfɑː/ AL-fah
l Lima LEE mah LEE MAH LEEMAH or LEE-MAH ˈliːmɑ li mah [ˈlimʌ] /ˈliːmɑː/ LEE-mah
k Kilo KEY loh KEY LOH KEYLOH or KEY-LOH ˈkiːlo ki lo [ˈkiloʊ] /ˈkiːloʊ/ KEE-loh
s Sierra see AIR ah SEE AIR RAH SEEAIRAH or SEE-AIR-AH siˈerɑ si èr rah [siˈɛɾʌ] /siːˈɛrɑː/ see-ERR-ah

TED Talks Linguistics

Language In Local
TED Talks with Greek letters ΤΕΔ Ταλκς
TED Talks with Hindi letters तॆद् तल्क्स्
TED Talks with Chinese letters TED Tㄚ˙ㄌㄎㄙ
TED Talks with Cyrillic letters ТЕД Талкс
TED Talks with Hebrew letters טֶד טַלכס
TED Talks with Arabic letters تِد تَلكس
TED Talks with Tamil letters தெத் தல்க்ஸ்
TED Talks with Japanese letters てで たるくす
TED Talks with Armenian letters ՏԵԴ Տալկս

TED Talks ratings of this name

A Good Name 18%
82% A Bad Name
Masculine 3%
97% Feminine
Classic 61%
39% Modern
Mature 22%
78% Youthful
Formal 48%
52% Informal
Upper Class 27%
73% Common
Urban 54%
46% Natural
Wholesome 79%
21% Devious
Strong 30%
70% Delicate
Refined 35%
65% Rough
Strange 69%
31% Boring
Simple 30%
70% Complex
Serious 83%
17% Comedic
Nerdy 45%
55% Unintellectual
Characteristics Value
TED Talks's Optimism 20
TED Talks's Creativity 5
TED Talks's Resilience 4
TED Talks's Self-Control 15
TED Talks's Emotional Awareness 11
TED Talks's Sociability 11
TED Talks's Patience 9
TED Talks's Integrity 17
TED Talks's Willpower 8
TED Talks's Passion 18

Post statistic

Created Text Like Comments Hashtags Post value Go
2017.12.07. 22:52 Wildfires have gotten worse in the past 100 years, but why? Well, first, land that was... 5 294 52 1 53,14$
2017.12.05. 23:10 Have you heard of Mae Jemison, YouYou Tu, Katherine Johnson, Maryam Mirzakhani, or Rita... 10 709 119 1 70,98$
2017.12.04. 23:39 Actor Justin Baldoni has a challenge for men: “See if you can use the same qualities... 74 674 2 221 1 3 009,85$
2017.11.30. 22:21 The textile industry is one of the most polluting in the world. Thanks to the rise of... 10 182 187 1 82,22$
2017.11.29. 21:08 This is a self-portrait of @TEDFellow and artist Uldus... 9 013 53 0 56,75$
2017.11.28. 22:53 These children are reading inside of a mud cave. It’s part of a school in Bangladesh... 30 678 235 1 176,96$
2017.11.22. 16:45 When @TEDFellow Kayla Briët was four-years-old, her dad... 8 658 112 0 65,54$
2017.11.20. 21:50 This tower sucks up smog, turns it into clean air, and filters out the smog particles... 11 566 212 0 92,01$
2017.11.17. 19:12 What can octopuses teach us about different kinds of intelligence? Octopuses’ neurons... 25 077 392 0 223,76$
2017.11.16. 18:14 Jackson Bird is transgender, and he has a message for anyone too scared to ask... 17 258 446 2 185,67$
2017.11.14. 23:10 This is a numeric model that depicts the cracks in Greenland’s ice sheet. It shows how... 9 363 84 1 62,27$
2017.11.10. 17:57 When Gretchen Carlson spoke out about her experience of workplace harassment, it... 39 461 441 1 358,98$

TED Talks National Statistics for Popularity and Rank

TED Talks National Statistic for the Name TED TALKS
Population Estimate 4706 +/- 2.2%
National Rank 12602
Percentile Rank 0.5
Proportion per 100k 0.4
SSA Baby Name Population 747
SSA Baby Name per 100k 2.5
SSA Baby Name Rank 29252
SSA Baby Name Percentile Rank 0.7

TED Talks Summary

  • TED TALKS is ranked as the 12602th most popular given name in the United States with an estimated population of 4706.
  • This name is in the 50th percentile, this means that nearly 2% of all the first names are more popular.
  • There are 0.4 people named TED TALKS for every 100,000 Americans.
  • Based on the analysis of 100 years worth of data from the Social Security Administration's (SSA) Baby Names database, the estimated population of people named TED TALKS is 747
  • According to our algorithm there are 270 last names associated with the name TED TALKS.

Race and Ethinicity

The race and Hispanic origin distribution of the people with the name TED TALKS
Race or Hispanic origin % of population with name % of US general population % difference
White 88.23% 56.23% 32 %
Hispanic origin 4.53% 11.43% -6.9%
Black 3.23% 21.33% -18.1%
Asian or Pacific Islander 1.43% 5.93% -4.5%
Two or more races 3.43% 3.13% 0.3%
American Indian or Alaskan Native -0.83% 1.93% -2.76%

Summary

The race and Hispanic origin distribution of the people with the name TED TALKS is 88.23% White, 4.53% Hispanic origin, 3.23% Black, 1.43% Asian or Pacific Islander, 3.43% Two or More Races, and -0.83 American Indian or Alaskan Native. These figures should be considered only as a rough estimate. The purpose of this graph is to compare the name's specific race and Hispanic origin distribution to the distribution in the general population of the US.

The vertical blue bars represent the race distribution of people that have the name. The yellow horizontal lines represent the race distribution of the general population. The amount by which the blue bars extend past the yellow horizontal lines determines how likely a person with the name will be part of a given race or Hispanic origin group.

On this basis, the people with the name TED TALKS have a higher likelyhood of being White and a lower likelyhood of being Black.

Ethnic and Cultural Name Categories

The first name TED TALKS is included in the following name catgories:
  • US masculine baby name - Social Security Administration
  • Turkish masculine given name