Am Museum of Natural History

Official Instagram page of the American Museum of Natural History in New York City

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http://anmh.org/

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Often considered the most dangerous bird in the world, the cassowary is one animal you wouldn't want to provoke. Their feet have a dagger-like claw on the inner toe that can grow up to 4 inches long, so cassowaries can easily slice predators with a kick. While flightless, this bird can jump nearly 7 feet in the air and run at speeds of up to 31 miles per hour. The southern cassowary is the largest of the three cassowary species and the second-heaviest bird in the world, after the ostrich. Photo: Max Pixel

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American Martens (Martes americana) don't like being out in the open. They’d rather hide in trees or underbrush so raptors or wild cats can’t spot them. Clear-cutting and fur trapping have taken a toll on marten populations, but with forest regrowth and trapping laws, these shy, solitary hunters are rebounding. Find this species in the Hall of North American Mammals in a diorama depicting Crater Lake, OR. Photo: Fish and Wildlife Service

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We’re celebrating cephalopods at the Milstein Science Series on Sunday. So today, we're highlighting a cephalopod species: The southern dumpling squid (Euprymna tasmanica). The nocturnal critter has a bioluminescent light organ that may help it hide from predators. Find out more about cephalopods on Sunday from 11am - 4pm. Free with Museum admission! Photo: Mark Norman/Museum Victoria

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Look closely! This isn't just any old skull: A curious confluence of history, industry, and art can be seen in the bones of this rough-toothed dolphin (Steno bredanensis). The 19.5-inch-long skull is covered with scrimshaw, colored carvings of trees, flags, ships, and a harlequin pattern. It's a large and unusual example of the distinctive 19th-century art form that flourished among whalers. Photo: AMNH/D. Finnin

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It's a porcupine! It's a hedgehog? It's a short-beaked echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus), an egg-laying mammal. When it’s under attack, it rolls into ball and bares its sharp spines—which are modified hairs made of keratin, the same structural protein found in horns, hooves, & nails. This defense seems to work: echidnas in both captivity and the wild have been known to live up to 50 years. Photo: Nuytsia@Tas

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This mini-monkey could fit in a human's hand: the pygmy marmoset (Callithrix pygmaea) may look like a tiny squirrel as it dashes through the rainforest canopy of South America, but this primate is actually the world's smallest monkey. Weighing in at 140 g and growing to be 13 cm long, it has a tail that’s longer than its body—and while not prehensile, it helps this monkey balance in the trees. Photo: Laura Wolf

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The fossil record seems to show that many animal groups get bigger over evolutionary time. Even sauropods started off relatively small. What explains the size increase, when it happens? One factor may be that bigger is safer: predators think twice about targeting the biggest animal in a group. But not every group gets bigger forever. Modern birds—even the tiny bee hummingbird (Mellisuga helenae), the smallest living bird—belong to the dinosaur lineage. Photo: Charlesjsharp

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Have you seen this giant critter on the beach? Unlikely: with a leg span of up to 4 m, Japanese spider crabs (Macrocheira kaempferi) are the world's largest arthropods and live deep in the Pacific Ocean. Walking legs & chelipeds (claw-bearing legs) grow throughout their life but crabs often lose limbs to predators or nets. They can survive with up to 3 missing walking legs & can even regrow them. Photo: Takashi Hososhima

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Tiny peacock spiders make up for size in pizzazz. Males, like Maratus volans pictured here, are only about 5 mm long, but they’re famous for their flashy midsection and leg-raising mating dance. To enchant a female, they display a flap-like body part called a fan. There are more than 40 peacock species including one, Maratus jactatus, that was nicknamed Sparklemuffin for its iridescent scales. It’s a lot to impress a potential mate, but there's a lot at stake: if a female spider doesn’t like your dance moves, she might just eat you alive. Photo: Jürgen Otto

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Last night, we hosted 700 guests at the annual #AMNHgala in Milstein Hall of Ocean Life, where Bono and The Edge of U2 gave a special performance. This annual benefit supports the Museum’s education and science programs. Thank you to everyone who helped make the 2017 #AMNHgala a success! Photos: AMNH/D. Finnin and C. Chesek

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When the weather gets foul, musk oxen's strategy is to stay and cope. Unlike Arctic caribou, they do not migrate seasonally. Instead, their squat, woolly bodies limit heat loss, even when temperatures plunge below -40°F (- 40°C). Extreme shifts in climate, however, can distress musk oxen. But this too is part of their survival strategy: Study of ancient DNA reveals that over many millennia, musk ox populations have undergone repeated boom and bust cycles in response to climate fluctuations. Being able to rebound after population collapses may have helped musk oxen survive the end of the Ice Age when most other large mammals, like woolly mammoths, died out. Photo: Bering Land Bridge National Preserve

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Hey there! This #GivingTuesday, your gift can help more than 320,000 NYC school children visit the Museum for free—and today, your donation will go even farther: A generous donor is matching all donations made today, up to $10K. If you’re able, please give to support science learning. #LinkinBio Photo: Airwolfhound

Am Museum of Natural History Name Data

Am Museum of Natural History Data Details
Am Museum of Natural History full length: 28 characters (28 bytes)
Unique part(s): Am Museum of Natural History
Am Museum of Natural History Name Volwes: Aueuoauaio (10 characters)
Am Museum of Natural History Name Consonants: m Msm f Ntrl Hstry (18 characters)

Am Museum of Natural History user Name Encoding

  • 11000111000100001100110001110 Decimal name:
  • 0000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000 Binary name:
  • 65 109 32 77 117 115 101 117 109 32 111 102 32 78 97 116 117 114 97 108 32 72 105 115 116 111 114 121 ASCII name:
  • 416d204d757365756d206f66204e61747572616c20486973746f7279 HEX name:
  • 19ed778c262310696f574e88bfc89b6f MD5 Encoding:
  • 65093a51fe0b26cd9c9716df4d1d0912449d8084 SHA1 Encoding:
  • AMMSMFNTRLHSTR Metaphone name:
  • A525 Name Soundex:
  • QW0gTXVzZXVtIG9mIE5hdHVyYWwgSGlzdG9yeQ== Base64 Encoding:
  • yrotsiH larutaN fo muesuM mA Reverse name:

Am Museum of Natural History user name Nato Encoding

Letter Code Word U.S. Army standard ICAO and ITU Roman standard FAA standards ICAO IPA standard SIO (France) ICAO recording (1955) Consolidated transcription
A Alfa
ATIS: Alpha
AL fah AL FAH ALFAH or AL-FAH ˈælfɑ al fah [ˈælfʌ] /ˈælfɑː/ AL-fah
m Mike Mike MIKE MIKE mɑik maïk [ˈmʌɪk] /ˈmaɪk/ MYK
M Mike Mike MIKE MIKE mɑik maïk [ˈmʌɪk] /ˈmaɪk/ MYK
u Uniform YOU nee form YOU NEE FORM or OO NEE FORM YOUNEE FORM or YOU-NEE-FORM or OO-NEE-FORM ˈjuːnifɔːm or ˈuːnifɔrm you ni form, ou ni form [ˈjunɪ̈fɔ˞m], [ˈunɪ̈fɔ˞m] /ˈjuːniːfɔːrm/ EW-nee-form or /ˈuːniːfɔːrm/ OO-nee-form
s Sierra see AIR ah SEE AIR RAH SEEAIRAH or SEE-AIR-AH siˈerɑ si èr rah [siˈɛɾʌ] /siːˈɛrɑː/ see-ERR-ah
e Echo EKK oh ECK OH ECKOH or ECK-OH ˈeko èk o [ˈɛkoʊ] /ˈɛkoʊ/
u Uniform YOU nee form YOU NEE FORM or OO NEE FORM YOUNEE FORM or YOU-NEE-FORM or OO-NEE-FORM ˈjuːnifɔːm or ˈuːnifɔrm you ni form, ou ni form [ˈjunɪ̈fɔ˞m], [ˈunɪ̈fɔ˞m] /ˈjuːniːfɔːrm/ EW-nee-form or /ˈuːniːfɔːrm/ OO-nee-form
m Mike Mike MIKE MIKE mɑik maïk [ˈmʌɪk] /ˈmaɪk/ MYK
o Oscar OSS car OSS CAH OSS-SCAR or OSS-CAR ˈɔskɑ oss kar [ˈɑskɹ̩] /ˈɒskɑː/ OS-kah
f Foxtrot FOKS trot FOKS TROT FOKSTROT or FOKS-TROT ˈfɔkstrɔt fox trott [ˈfɑkstrɑt] /ˈfɒkstrɒt/ FOKS-trot
N November NOH vem ber NO VEM BER NOVEMBER or NO-VEM-BER noˈvembə no vèmm ber [noʊˈvɛmbɹ̩] /noʊˈvɛmbər/ noh-VEM-bər
a Alfa
ATIS: Alpha
AL fah AL FAH ALFAH or AL-FAH ˈælfɑ al fah [ˈælfʌ] /ˈælfɑː/ AL-fah
t Tango TANG go TANG GO TANGGO or TANG-GO ˈtænɡo tang go [ˈtæŋɡoʊ] /ˈtæŋɡoʊ/ TANG-goh
u Uniform YOU nee form YOU NEE FORM or OO NEE FORM YOUNEE FORM or YOU-NEE-FORM or OO-NEE-FORM ˈjuːnifɔːm or ˈuːnifɔrm you ni form, ou ni form [ˈjunɪ̈fɔ˞m], [ˈunɪ̈fɔ˞m] /ˈjuːniːfɔːrm/ EW-nee-form or /ˈuːniːfɔːrm/ OO-nee-form
r Romeo ROW me oh ROW ME OH ROWME OH or ROW-ME-OH ˈroːmiˑo ro mi o [ˈɹoʊmi.oʊ] /ˈroʊmiːoʊ/ ROH-mee-oh
a Alfa
ATIS: Alpha
AL fah AL FAH ALFAH or AL-FAH ˈælfɑ al fah [ˈælfʌ] /ˈælfɑː/ AL-fah
l Lima LEE mah LEE MAH LEEMAH or LEE-MAH ˈliːmɑ li mah [ˈlimʌ] /ˈliːmɑː/ LEE-mah
H Hotel HO tell HOH TELL HOHTELL or HOH-TELL hoːˈtel ho tèll [hoʊˈtɛl] /hoʊˈtɛl/ hoh-TEL
i India IN dee ah IN DEE AH INDEE AH or IN-DEE-AH ˈindiˑɑ in di ah [ˈɪndi.ʌ] /ˈɪndiːɑː/ IN-dee-ah
s Sierra see AIR ah SEE AIR RAH SEEAIRAH or SEE-AIR-AH siˈerɑ si èr rah [siˈɛɾʌ] /siːˈɛrɑː/ see-ERR-ah
t Tango TANG go TANG GO TANGGO or TANG-GO ˈtænɡo tang go [ˈtæŋɡoʊ] /ˈtæŋɡoʊ/ TANG-goh
o Oscar OSS car OSS CAH OSS-SCAR or OSS-CAR ˈɔskɑ oss kar [ˈɑskɹ̩] /ˈɒskɑː/ OS-kah
r Romeo ROW me oh ROW ME OH ROWME OH or ROW-ME-OH ˈroːmiˑo ro mi o [ˈɹoʊmi.oʊ] /ˈroʊmiːoʊ/ ROH-mee-oh
y Yankee YANG kee YANG KEY YANGKEY or YANG-KEY ˈjænki yang ki [ˈjæŋki] /ˈjæŋkiː/ YANG-kee

Am Museum of Natural History Linguistics

Language In Local
Am Museum of Natural History with Greek letters Ἀμ Μυσευμ ὀφ Νατυραλ Ἱστορυ
Am Museum of Natural History with Hindi letters अम् मुसॆउम् ऒफ़् नतुरल् हिस्तॊर्य्
Am Museum of Natural History with Chinese letters Aㄇ˙ Mㄨ˙ㄙㄜ˙ㄨ˙ㄇ˙ ㄛ˙ㄈ Nㄚ˙ㄊㄨ˙ㄖㄚ˙ㄌ Hㄧ˙ㄙㄊㄛ˙ㄖy
Am Museum of Natural History with Cyrillic letters Ам Мусеум оф Натурал Хисторы
Am Museum of Natural History with Hebrew letters ַם מֻסֶֻם ֳף נַטֻרַל הִסטֳרי
Am Museum of Natural History with Arabic letters َم مُسُِم ُف نَتُرَل هِستُري
Am Museum of Natural History with Tamil letters அம் முஸெஉம் ஒப் நதுரல் ஹிஸ்தொர்ய்
Am Museum of Natural History with Japanese letters あむ むせうむ おふ なてぅらる ひすとるい
Am Museum of Natural History with Armenian letters Ամ Մուսեում ոֆ Նատուրալ Հիստորյ

Am Museum of Natural History ratings of this name

A Good Name 72%
28% A Bad Name
Masculine 68%
32% Feminine
Classic 6%
94% Modern
Mature 83%
17% Youthful
Formal 20%
80% Informal
Upper Class 81%
19% Common
Urban 83%
17% Natural
Wholesome 23%
77% Devious
Strong 26%
74% Delicate
Refined 48%
52% Rough
Strange 90%
10% Boring
Simple 79%
21% Complex
Serious 75%
25% Comedic
Nerdy 76%
24% Unintellectual
Characteristics Value
Am Museum of Natural History's Optimism 8
Am Museum of Natural History's Creativity 9
Am Museum of Natural History's Resilience 7
Am Museum of Natural History's Self-Control 13
Am Museum of Natural History's Emotional Awareness 14
Am Museum of Natural History's Sociability 17
Am Museum of Natural History's Patience 11
Am Museum of Natural History's Integrity 10
Am Museum of Natural History's Willpower 12
Am Museum of Natural History's Passion 6

Post statistic

Created Text Like Comments Hashtags Post value Go
2017.12.11. 03:38 Often considered the most dangerous bird in the world, the cassowary is one animal you... 1 063 21 0 4,29$
2017.12.10. 04:27 American Martens (Martes americana) don't like being out in the open. They’d rather... 2 809 16 0 4,70$
2017.12.09. 00:23 We’re celebrating cephalopods at the Milstein Science Series on Sunday. So today, we're... 2 068 11 0 4,30$
2017.12.08. 03:43 Look closely! This isn't just any old skull: A curious confluence of history, industry,... 3 648 37 0 6,31$
2017.12.06. 23:05 It's a porcupine! It's a hedgehog? It's a short-beaked echidna (Tachyglossus... 3 989 43 0 6,96$
2017.12.06. 03:58 This mini-monkey could fit in a human's hand: the pygmy marmoset (Callithrix pygmaea)... 2 237 29 0 5,05$
2017.12.05. 03:44 The fossil record seems to show that many animal groups get bigger over evolutionary... 3 334 11 0 4,55$
2017.12.04. 03:28 Have you seen this giant critter on the beach? Unlikely: with a leg span of up to 4 m,... 2 771 29 0 5,33$
2017.12.03. 04:38 Tiny peacock spiders make up for size in pizzazz. Males, like Maratus volans pictured... 4 489 46 0 7,58$
2017.12.02. 00:34 Last night, we hosted 700 guests at the annual 2 885 26 2 5,23$
2017.11.30. 01:14 When the weather gets foul, musk oxen's strategy is to stay and cope. Unlike Arctic... 1 743 7 0 4,11$
2017.11.28. 18:47 Hey there! This #GivingTuesday, your gift can help... 2 546 15 2 4,58$

Am Museum of Natural History National Statistics for Popularity and Rank

Am Museum of Natural History National Statistic for the Name AM MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY
Population Estimate 4439 +/- 5.3%
National Rank 48757
Percentile Rank 0.6
Proportion per 100k 0.6
SSA Baby Name Population 1100
SSA Baby Name per 100k 1
SSA Baby Name Rank 22036
SSA Baby Name Percentile Rank 0.6

Am Museum of Natural History Summary

  • AM MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY is ranked as the 48757th most popular given name in the United States with an estimated population of 4439.
  • This name is in the 60th percentile, this means that nearly 2% of all the first names are more popular.
  • There are 0.6 people named AM MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY for every 100,000 Americans.
  • Based on the analysis of 100 years worth of data from the Social Security Administration's (SSA) Baby Names database, the estimated population of people named AM MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY is 1100
  • According to our algorithm there are 270 last names associated with the name AM MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY.

Race and Ethinicity

The race and Hispanic origin distribution of the people with the name AM MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY
Race or Hispanic origin % of population with name % of US general population % difference
White 84.89% 65.65% 19.24 %
Hispanic origin 6.89% 7.85% -0.96%
Black 4.59% 19.45% -14.86%
Asian or Pacific Islander 2.49% 3.65% -1.16%
Two or more races 0.99% 3.65% -2.66%
American Indian or Alaskan Native 0.16% -0.27% 0.43%

Summary

The race and Hispanic origin distribution of the people with the name AM MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY is 84.89% White, 6.89% Hispanic origin, 4.59% Black, 2.49% Asian or Pacific Islander, 0.99% Two or More Races, and 0.16 American Indian or Alaskan Native. These figures should be considered only as a rough estimate. The purpose of this graph is to compare the name's specific race and Hispanic origin distribution to the distribution in the general population of the US.

The vertical blue bars represent the race distribution of people that have the name. The yellow horizontal lines represent the race distribution of the general population. The amount by which the blue bars extend past the yellow horizontal lines determines how likely a person with the name will be part of a given race or Hispanic origin group.

On this basis, the people with the name AM MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY have a higher likelyhood of being White and a lower likelyhood of being Black.

Ethnic and Cultural Name Categories

The first name AM MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY is included in the following name catgories:
  • US masculine baby name - Social Security Administration
  • Turkish masculine given name